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Racial and Gender Disparities Within the Direct Care Workforce: Five Key Findings

Brief Expanding Access & Cultural Competence
November 6, 2017
Racial and Gender Disparities Within the Direct Care Workforce: Five Key Findings

Despite their critical role in supporting older adults and people with disabilities nationwide, women in the direct care workforce—and women of color, in particular—are more likely to live in poverty than men. Women of color in direct care also have smaller family incomes and are more reliant on public benefits than their white counterparts. This research brief examines racial and gender disparities in the direct care workforce, with a focus on populations that have historically experienced differential treatment in employment. Specifically, we ask: how has the racial and gender composition of this workforce changed over the past 10 years? And how do race and gender shape the demographic, employment, and economic characteristics of the direct care workforce?

Stephen Campbell
About The Author

Stephen Campbell

Data and Policy Analyst
Stephen Campbell is a Data and Policy Analyst at PHI. In this capacity, he studies and writes about a variety of issues facing the direct care workforce–with the goal of reforming state and national policies.
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